Hi my name is Christina. I like pretty things and learning about the world. I belong to unusual fandoms and make gifs when I'm bored. I tend to ignore big problems and overreact to small ones. I love good conversations with people but I hate making eye contact with them. I feel most comfortable on the water and happiest when I'm singing.

Background Painting by Neil E.

likeafieldmouse:

Galileo’s Moon Drawings

"Galileo Galilei did not invent the telescope. The honor is usually reserved for Hans Libbershey, a Dutch eyeglass maker, who was at least the first person to apply for a patent, in 1608. But Galileo was a very early adopter, and improver, of the instrument.

In 1609, he made the drawings above ‘from life,’ the very first realistic renderings of the Moon (now housed at the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale in Florence). 

Prior to Galileo’s illustrations, virtually no one bothered to represent the Moon with its spots the way it actually appeared.

After his observations, Galileo planned the following year to create an entire series of illustrations, presumably ‘to show how the shadows of individual features changed with the illumination.’

This, however, became unnecessary since ‘even the Jesuit fathers in Rome were convinced that that the Moon’s surface was uneven.

He explained his observations of a coruscated, pitted, and mountainous Moon and included several additional drawings. (He also made scores of drawings of Jupiter and several constellations.) 

Like many scholars of his day, Galileo was also an accomplished draftsman, and like scholars still today, he was required to excel at the fine art of self-promotion, forced not only to compete with his contemporaries, but also to persuade his patrons as well as mollify the institutional authorities.”

July 21, 2014

cross-connect:

The Exquisite ’ Inner Space ’ Architecture of Matthew Simmonds

” Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space.” ( Artodyssey )

From his early childhood, Simmonds was fascinated by stone buildings, an affection that flows into his artworks, where stone architecture is used as a central theme. Particularly the medieval architecture, with its striving to get to a new sophistication of space, comes alive in the marble. Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space.

Selected and Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Pretty words aren’t gonna  b r i n g   h e r   b a c k  man, so save your prayers. She would have laughed at them anyway.

red-lipstick:

Abdul-Rahman Najmuddin (Cairo, Egypt) - Xibir (detail), 2013     Drawings: Mechanical Pencils, PS

red-lipstick:

Abdul-Rahman Najmuddin (Cairo, Egypt) - Xibir (detail), 2013     Drawings: Mechanical Pencils, PS

 
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